What Are The Five Risk Factors For CAD Quizlet?

What are five risk factors for CAD?

The traditional risk factors for coronary artery disease are high LDL cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure, family history, diabetes, smoking, being post-menopausal for women and being older than 45 for men, according to Fisher.

Obesity may also be a risk factor..

Who is most at risk for heart attack?

Heart attack risk factors include:Age. Men age 45 or older and women age 55 or older are more likely to have a heart attack than are younger men and women.Tobacco. … High blood pressure. … High blood cholesterol or triglyceride levels. … Obesity. … Diabetes. … Metabolic syndrome. … Family history of heart attacks.More items…•

What are the 6 secondary CVD risk factors?

If you were to ask just about anyone in these enlightened times what the primary risks are for developing heart disease they would be able to rattle off the main culprits: high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol levels, family history, gender, and smoking.

What are the 4 uncontrollable risk factors?

The “uncontrollable” risk factors are: Age (the risk increases with age)…The “controllable” risk factors are:Smoking.High blood pressure.High blood cholesterol.High blood sugar (diabetes)Obesity and overweight.Obesity and Overweight.Physical inactivity.Stress.

What are the 11 coronary risk factors?

There are many risk factors for CAD and some can be controlled but not others. The risk factors that can be controlled (modifiable) are: High BP; high blood cholesterol levels; smoking; diabetes; overweight or obesity; lack of physical activity; unhealthy diet and stress.

What contributes to CAD?

CAD is caused by plaque buildup in the walls of the arteries that supply blood to the heart (called coronary arteries) and other parts of the body. Plaque is made up of deposits of cholesterol and other substances in the artery.

Who is most at risk for coronary artery disease?

Risk factors for coronary artery disease include:Age. Getting older increases your risk of damaged and narrowed arteries.Sex. Men are generally at greater risk of coronary artery disease. … Family history. … Smoking. … High blood pressure. … High blood cholesterol levels. … Diabetes. … Overweight or obesity.More items…•

How can I reduce my risk of heart disease?

Fortunately, there are many things you can do to reduce your chances of getting heart disease:Control your blood pressure. … Keep your cholesterol and triglyceride levels under control. … Stay at a healthy weight. … Eat a healthy diet. … Get regular exercise. … Limit alcohol. … Don’t smoke. … Manage stress.More items…

What is the most common cause of CAD?

The most frequent cause of CAD is injury and plaque buildup in these vessels, which are called coronary arteries. When your arteries narrow, it leaves less space for blood to flow. This decreases blood flow and makes it difficult for your body to supply your heart with the blood it needs.

What risk factors can you control?

Risk factors that can be controlled include blood pressure, diabetes, cholesterol, weight, smoking and other wellness factors like physical activity and stress level. Understanding the role these factors play in your health is an important step in reducing your risk for heart disease.

What are the 5 risk factors?

Controllable risk factors include:Smoking.High LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, and low HDL, or “good” cholesterol.Uncontrolled hypertension (high blood pressure)Physical inactivity.Obesity.Uncontrolled diabetes.Uncontrolled stress and anger.

What are examples of risk factors?

Risk factor examplesNegative attitudes, values or beliefs.Low self-esteem.Drug, alcohol or solvent abuse.Poverty.Children of parents in conflict with the law.Homelessness.Presence of neighbourhood crime.Early and repeated anti-social behaviour.More items…•

What is a uncontrollable risk factor?

Uncontrollable risk factors are those which you cannot influence. Age. Family history. Ethnicity. Gender.

How many health risk factors can you control?

Fewer than one percent of Americans have all seven of their modifiable risk factors under control, and there’s one, an unhealthy diet, that seems to be the hardest for most of us to manage.